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poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

photochrom prints from algeria, 1899.

1. bab el oued

2. the algiers harbor.

3. the algiers harbor by moonlight.

4. the abdul rahman mosque

5. the fountain of the great mosque, algiers

6. passengers disembark from a ship

7. mother and son

8. at the coffee house I

9. at the coffee house II

10. a street scene in algiers.

Another myth that is firmly upheld is that disabled people are dependent and non-disabled people are independent. No one is actually independent. This is a myth perpetuated by disablism and driven by capitalism - we are all actually interdependent. Chances are, disabled or not, you don’t grow all of your food. Chances are, you didn’t build the car, bike, wheelchair, subway, shoes, or bus that transports you. Chances are you didn’t construct your home. Chances are you didn’t sew your clothing (or make the fabric and thread used to sew it). The difference between the needs that many disabled people have and the needs of people who are not labelled as disabled is that non-disabled people have had their dependencies normalized. The world has been built to accommodate certain needs and call the people who need those things independent, while other needs are considered exceptional. Each of us relies on others every day. We all rely on one another for support, resources, and to meet our needs. We are all interdependent. This interdependence is not weakness; rather, it is a part of our humanity.
AJ Withers Disability Politics and Theory p109 (via dandyfied)

jenfold:

Because the gifs can’t do justice to the insanely funny horror that is Mr Blobby on the Big Fat Quiz of the 90s.

practiceapps:

Peter Maxwell Davies at 80
“And I think that listening to something like Mahler’s 6th or 9th symphonies, you realise that the music knows what the author doesn’t. You can hear the jackboots of the first world war in Mahler 9, even though Mahler died in 1911, and you can hear all sorts of things, if you’re that way inclined – which I am – in the music that Schoenberg and Stravinsky were writing before the first world war, like the Rite of Spring.””

practiceapps:

Peter Maxwell Davies at 80

And I think that listening to something like Mahler’s 6th or 9th symphonies, you realise that the music knows what the author doesn’t. You can hear the jackboots of the first world war in Mahler 9, even though Mahler died in 1911, and you can hear all sorts of things, if you’re that way inclined – which I am – in the music that Schoenberg and Stravinsky were writing before the first world war, like the Rite of Spring.””

burnedshoes:

© Ara Güler, 1957, Istanbul
“Nobody has captured, documented and preserved the Istanbul of the Fifties and Sixties, with its streets, pavements, shops, its run-down factories, its ships, horse-drawn carriages, busses, clouds, taxis, houses, bridges, chimneys, billows of smoke, people and its non-descript atmosphere, as well as Ara Güler,” who “photographs not only the visual elements of Istanbul’s streets, but their soul,” as Orhan Pamuk writes in the coffee-table book in which the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature and the Magnum photographer touchingly pay joint homage to their hometown.
As the title image they chose the present photograph, which reflects the legendary Istanbul feeling of “hüzün”, a kind of melancholy, particularly well. The two dark figures in their boats, the glittering water, the famous mosques and the Galata Bridge in the distance, out of focus, shrouded by fog. (+)

burnedshoes:

© Ara Güler, 1957, Istanbul

“Nobody has captured, documented and preserved the Istanbul of the Fifties and Sixties, with its streets, pavements, shops, its run-down factories, its ships, horse-drawn carriages, busses, clouds, taxis, houses, bridges, chimneys, billows of smoke, people and its non-descript atmosphere, as well as Ara Güler,” who “photographs not only the visual elements of Istanbul’s streets, but their soul,” as Orhan Pamuk writes in the coffee-table book in which the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature and the Magnum photographer touchingly pay joint homage to their hometown.

As the title image they chose the present photograph, which reflects the legendary Istanbul feeling of “hüzün”, a kind of melancholy, particularly well. The two dark figures in their boats, the glittering water, the famous mosques and the Galata Bridge in the distance, out of focus, shrouded by fog. (+)

knitphilia:

Adara Sánchez Anguiano drawing with thread.

knitphilia:

Adara Sánchez Anguiano drawing with thread.

petramarwood:

alljustletters:

so, we know that gallifreyan mythology has a concept of hell (cf. minuet in hell), which kinda demands for them to have a concept of heaven as well. the closest thing to an afterlife there is on gallifrey is your biodata/memory/personality imprint in the matrix. we do know that it is possible to…

HEADCANON ACCEPTED!

charamei:

Imagine the worst possible thing in the universe, then don’t bother, because you’re looking at it right now. This is evil refined as engineering.

Henceforth this shall be known as That One Scene That Made Charamei Learn To GIF Because She Wanted To Talk About It So Much, so sit down, kids, because I’ve just spent the better part of a day learning to rip DVDs and swearing at size limits and boy am I going to talk now.

For those who don’t know, the scene on the left is from The Invisible Enemy, in which the Doctor contracts a mind-controlling virus and so, naturally, medical science being what it is in the future, they and Leela make tiny clones of themselves and enter their own brain to get rid of it. So yes, that is Four standing in (and discussing the biology of) their own brainInvisible Enemy is also the serial which introduced K-9, in a completely unrelated piece of trivia.

Into the Dalek has some very clear parallels with Invisible Enemy on a storytelling level, so much so that every classic Who fan I’ve seen liveblogging it has made a comment to the effect of ‘are we getting another tin dog then’. But in terms of scene-to-scene parallels, this one is by far the most noteworthy: the Doctor specifically points out the part of each brain which is responsible for the creation, or simulation, of a hivemind. And in the second example, Twelve explicitly calls it evil.

So. Let’s talk about the reflex link.

Gallifreyans are telepathic and have a hivemind. There are plenty of examples of this, but the one which springs immediately to mind is in Dalek:

Doctor: I’d know [if any more Gallifreyans had survived the Time War]. In here. (taps head) Feels like there’s no one.

The nature of the hivemind has varied throughout the species’ history: originally it was pretty much all-encompassing, save for some lucky individuals, but after Rassilon rewrote their genome to accommodate things like regeneration and individual thought it seems to be more like the Ood: a sort of collective subconscious.

There’s also the Matrix, which is a collective store of all Gallifreyan… well, all Gallifreyans. Brain scans, biodata, knowledge. There are multiple ways to access it, but at least one of them seems to be telepathy: it’d be a bit like having WiFi delivered straight to your brain.

So just to clear this up, the reflex link is not the source of all Gallifreyan telepathy or the primary link out to the hivemind. First, there are more than a thousand Gallifreyans in existence; second, the Doctor had demonstrated telepathic abilities before Invisible Enemy (most importantly in Deadly Assassin, where they were able to interface with the Matrix) and would do so again in later serials. What the reflex link seems to be is the remote access link to the Matrix: Four was able to access it in Deadly Assassin because they were literally plugged into it, but the reflex link would have allowed them to access it from anywhere in the universe.

And that’s where the parallels start to get interesting.

Let’s get the obvious one out of the way first: among its other uses, the Matrix acts as a repository for the memories of dead Gallifreyans. Meanwhile, the cortex vault is storing the Dalek’s memories… and censoring them.

Which brings us to the less obvious one.

The Matrix stores the biodata of everyone on Gallifrey. Biodata, as the Time Lords use the term, is more than just a person’s memories, DNA and biometrics: it’s also a continually-updated copy of their timeline information, and the connection goes both ways. If you change a person’s biodata, you change the person themself. This was used to great effect in Gallifrey VI: Ascension: Romana quite literally set the entire planet back three years in its history by simply plugging a biodata back-up from that time* into the Matrix and letting it overwrite the current information.

*Okay, it was a bit more complicated than ‘a back-up’, but close enough.

You can edit people with the Matrix. You can remove entire chunks of memory, or tweak someone’s timeline so that certain events never happened to them at all. You can alter the way they perceive events and ensure that they toe the party line - you don’t even have to go to the bother of telling them what the party line is.

*points up to Twelve* Sound familiar?

Considering how utterly useless the Time Lords were in Classic Who (Four once said they had ‘about as much sense of adventure as dormice’), and how terrifying they seem to have abruptly become in the Time War, it’s not unreasonable to wonder just how far they took their Matrix editing in the name of survival. Did Romana or Rassilon just roll out a specieswide upgrade one day? Everyone went to bed harmless bureaucrats and scientists, and woke up with a gun and a burning need to slaughter as many aliens as possible? It kind of looks that way, doesn’t it?

Evil refined as engineering, indeed. The Time Lords, as always, did it first.

likeafieldmouse:

Martin Usborne - The Silence of Dogs in Cars (2011)

1,902 plays

socrappyicoulddie:

http://media.tumblr.com/a8bfbe879ea73d2d824dec6240a308d0/tumblr_mr4ii4xp2k1r2xpibo1_1280.jpg

YASSSSSSSSSS

Columbia University Student Will Drag Her Mattress Around Campus Until Her Rapist Is Gone

"I think the act of carrying something that is normally found in our bedroom out into the light is supposed to mirror the way I’ve talked to the media and talked to different news channels, etc," Emma continues in the full video which you can watch here. 

greatwhiteprivilege:

threeeyedboy:

greatwhiteprivilege:

it ok

image

WHAT THE FUCK IS THAT THING

ur own lil cheerleader

image

hifructosemag:

John Grade is a Seattle-based artist who creates monumental installations that significantly alter the viewers’ experience of architecture and nature. Gritty, industrial materials are Grade’s trademark. He likes his work to have weight in an almost precarious sort of way, as if the piece might give and crush the viewer at any second. Inspired by the land art movement of the ’60s and ’70s, Grade’s work echoes the scale and impact of famous Earthworks like Spiral Jetty, though most of his interventions take place inside of museum and gallery environments rather than the land itself. Read more on Hi-Fructose.