spare van keys

zone-b:

minusmanhattan:

George Orwell’s Birthday Party.

scavengedluxury:

Queen Elizabeth flats, Gorbals, 1960s. Joseph McKenzie?

scavengedluxury:

Queen Elizabeth flats, Gorbals, 1960s. Joseph McKenzie?

sandflake:

I dearly wish that people would view their bodies as they view flowers…

Veins everywhere?

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gorgeous~

Skin patches? Birthmarks?

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hella rad~

Scars? Stretch marks?

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beautiful~

Freckles? Moles? Acne scars?

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heckie yeah~

Large? Curvy?

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lovely~

Small? Thin?

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charming~

Missing a few pieces?

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handsome as ever~

Feel like you just look weird?

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you’re fantastic looking~

satindolls:

“I spent only one night photographing Billie Holiday,” he [Carl Van Vechten] wrote, “but it was the whole of one night and it seemed like a whole career.” The session began badly. Gerry Major had arranged the meeting, and had asked Holiday to wear a gown for the sitting. Holiday, however, arrived “at the appointed hour in a plain gray suit and facial expression equally depressing.” In spite of his disappointment, Van Vechten began photographing Holiday. It wasn’t going well and he was considering giving up when he thought to show Holiday his photographs of Bessie Smith. The photographs brought Holiday to tears; she explained that Smith had been an inspiration to her in the early days of her career. Their discussion of Smith softened the mood, and Holiday agreed to wearing a drape fashioned to look like an evening dress instead of her suit for some of the photographs.

At midnight, Holiday announced that she had to go home; she promised to come back shortly. Van Vechten, afraid she might go in search of drugs, sent his assistant Saul Mauriber to Harlem with her to insure her return. Holiday and Mauriber reappeared with Mister, Holiday’s boxer. She was in a different mood entirely, more lively and relaxed. Van Vechten continued to photograph her for some time.

Afterward, “she related in great detail the sad, bittersweet story of her tempestuous life.” Van Vechten’s wife Fania soon joined the group, and “in a short time Fania, like the rest of us, was in tears, and suddenly, also like the rest of us, found herself attached to Billie as if she had known her intimately for years.” Holiday didn’t leave the apartment until shortly before dawn. “We never saw her again,” Van Vechten wrote, “but not one of us will ever forget her.”

Portraits of the Artists, Esquire Magazine (1962)

Billie Holiday photographed by Carl Van Vechten, c. March 1949

motherwellrules:

All of time and space, everything that ever happened or ever will
-Where do you want to start?
And so we say farewell to our friend Voltaire who died, as so many Frenchmen do, in a freak philosophy accident.
John Finnemore’s Souvenir Programme (via souvenirsfromaprogramme)

Judith II (1909), Gustav Klimt

speakingparts:

'First tragedy: a common education, obligatory and wrong, that pushes us all into the same arena of having to have everything at all costs. In this arena we are pushed along like some strange and dark army in which some carry cannons and others carry crowbars. Therefore, the first classical division is to “stay with the weak.” But what I say is that, in a certain sense, everyone is weak, because everyone is a victim. And everyone is guilty, because everyone is ready to play the murderous game of possession. We have learned to have, possess and destroy.'Pier Paolo PasoliniWe Are All In DangerThe last interview with Pier Paolo Pasolini full

speakingparts:

'First tragedy: a common education, obligatory and wrong, that pushes us all into the same arena of having to have everything at all costs. In this arena we are pushed along like some strange and dark army in which some carry cannons and others carry crowbars. Therefore, the first classical division is to “stay with the weak.” But what I say is that, in a certain sense, everyone is weak, because everyone is a victim. And everyone is guilty, because everyone is ready to play the murderous game of possession. We have learned to have, possess and destroy.'

Pier Paolo Pasolini


We Are All In Danger
The last interview with Pier Paolo Pasolini
 full

speakingparts:



'All I want is that you look around and take notice of the tragedy. What is the tragedy? It¹s that there are no longer any human beings; there are only some strange machines that bump up against each other.'

Pier Paolo Pasolini


We Are All In Danger
The last interview with Pier Paolo Pasolini
 full

Stills: Salò o Le 120 Giornate Di Sodoma
Pier Paolo Pasolini 1975

madametoutnnoire:

Frida by Senegalese photographer Omar Viktor Diop, shot in Abidjan.

madametoutnnoire:

Frida by Senegalese photographer Omar Viktor Diop, shot in Abidjan.

captainamericass:

omfg so my little cousin (she’s 8) loves superheroes and we were in party city and she was browsing through the boys costumes because the girls side didn’t have the ones she wanted and then an employee tells her that she’s in the wrong side so she grabs a batman mask and says in the lowest voice possible for her age, “don’t question batman”

duckodeathreturns:

Faces of The Thick of It: 1990s edition

This is a little something I’ve been working on for quite a long while because let’s face it, it’s the kind of thing I like to do.  After discovering by chance the baby Malcolm and baby Jamie clips, I had to see how many more faces I could find*.  The only rules I set myself were that all the years given in the text must match the year of the clip — if it says 1994, it really is from 1994 and so on — and that I have to look at the clip and say yep, I can believe this is a younger version of the person I know from the show. 

***

Malcolm Tucker and his death glare, 1994, political editor of the most critical anti-government tabloid, tearing his way through the ranks on his way to the very top, and there’s nothing he won’t do to get his party out of opposition and back into Number 10 where they belong.

Jamie MacDonald and his tongue, 1996, exiting the courtroom — followed by barrister Geoff Holhurst QC (yes, really) — after he and his steely-eyed editor were found not to have defamed a lying twat of a government MP in an investigative article because every word they published was fucking true.

Peter Mannion MP and his bedroom eyes, 1994, a junior minister at Defra — where he’s just had the strangest encounter with a Sainbury’s press officer — during the time of his raging affair that will soon result in the birth of his son by his mistress, followed shortly thereafter by the burning of his record collection by his wife.

Hugh Abbot MP and his undiminished joie de vivre, 1996, it’s been a year since he won his Backbencher of the Year award and was called the future of ethical politics by Betty Boothroyd and life couldn’t be better as the requests for television and newspaper interviews still just keep pouring in!

Ollie Reeder and his fringe at Cambridge, 1998, where his idea of a great night clubbing is putting in his contact lenses and spending the entire time arguing with his girlfriend about whether the UK’s exit from Exchange Rate Mechanism had an overall positive or negative net effect on the voting habits of ABC1s in marginal constituencies during the last election.

Glenn Cullen and his sober professionalism, 1991, chairing a local party meeting in the absence of Hugh, and proving beyond a doubt he has always been reliable and also that he’s always been 55.

Nicola Murray and her first child related sporting humiliation, 1994, on her only attempt at doing a baby swim class with Katie, age 1, after which she informed James that fuck being a stay-at-home mum, they are getting a nanny, and she is going back to her job at the Leamington Town Council immediately, whether he likes it or not.

Terri Coverley and her scarf of musical theatre, 1999, just because she’s recently left her job as head of press at Waitrose to take up a civil service position as head of communications for the Department of Social Affairs, doesn’t mean she’s giving up her wine tastings, her book club, her dog agility classes, or directing her annual production of Joseph and His Technicolor Dreamcoat

Steve Fleming and his mustache of impotent rage, 1994, proving some people never ever EVER change.

Stewart Pearson and his favorite tie, 1998, proving that a weekend at a Celtic music festival, an introductory yoga class, half a tab of E — that he didn’t even take — and the cult of Steve Jobs, will change some people more than you’d expect. 

*I also have Dan Miller, Claire Ballentine, and Ben Swain, but for reasons of space they didn’t make the final cut.

landspeedrecord:

"none of it belongs to you.  You can only have it by letting it go.  You can only take if you prepared to give, and giving is not an investment.  It is not a day at the bargain counter.  It is a total risk of everything, of you and who you think you are, who you think you’d like to be, where you think you’d like to go—everything, and this forever, forever…"

landspeedrecord:

"none of it belongs to you.  You can only have it by letting it go.  You can only take if you prepared to give, and giving is not an investment.  It is not a day at the bargain counter.  It is a total risk of everything, of you and who you think you are, who you think you’d like to be, where you think you’d like to go—everything, and this forever, forever…"

les-sources-du-nil:

Glasgow School of Art glass plate negative showing students in costume. Early 1900’s

les-sources-du-nil:

Glasgow School of Art glass plate negative showing students in costume. Early 1900’s

Telling the oppressed that expressing their anger and hatred for their oppressors is okay is a huge step toward ending oppression, which is the real goal, not “ending hate” which is some abstract nonsense privileged people like to spout to try and pretend they’re not part of the problem because they don’t actively hate the oppressed.
smitethepatriarchy in this post. Just thought it was a really good articulation of something that gets repeated often without thought: the end goal isn’t really to “end hate.” It’s to eliminate oppressions. Hate is a feeling everyone has sooner or later, as is love — oppression is an extra obstacle the privileged group does not have to deal with/be burdened with (via ozziescribbler)